Translating Research into Next Generation Care Through Collaboration


Based in New York City, Weill Cornell Medicine Enterprise Innovation engages and collaborates with Weill Cornell Medicine faculty and trainees while fostering alliances with leaders in the biomedical industry and business and investment community. Our focus is to translate the application of emerging science and new technologies into world-class medical breakthroughs.

Integrating Weill Cornell Medicine’s Office of BioPharma Alliances and Research Collaborations, Center for Technology Licensing (CTL) at Weill Cornell, BioVenture eLab and Daedalus Fund for Innovation under a single, united organization, Enterprise Innovation encompasses the entire spectrum of an effective innovation ecosystem. We offer unique opportunities for faculty and trainees to transform their research into medical advances through collaborations including access to the Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute.

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Enterprise Innovation Metrics from FY17 to FY22

515
New Tech Disclosures
189
Issued US Patents
118
Licenses and Options
25
NewCo Launches

Learn about how to collaborate with our team of top-tier business development professionals to bring your innovations to life.

Testimonials

Dr. John Leonard
John P. Leonard, M.D., Senior Associate Dean of Innovation and Initiatives
Getting new innovations across the finish line requires collaboration, often with industry partners, to scale up findings for application in healthcare. Ultimately, we want the work we do here to have a real impact on patients. By fostering an entrepreneurial environment, we can do that.
Lisa Placanica, Ph.D.
Lisa Placanica, Ph.D., Senior Managing Director of the Center for Technology Licensing
There’s obviously fantastic research being done at Weill Cornell Medicine. So we want to work with faculty to identify aspects of their research that could be shaped into a product or a service, work with them to develop it and then to forge the partnership with a commercial entity. We also have to have a finger on the pulse of what industry is looking for: what venture firms are investing in, what pharma is trying to fill their pipeline with. And then we make connections between the two. We have to speak the language between the commercial enterprise and the academic researcher.
Neel Madhukar, Ph.D.
Neel Madhukar, Ph.D., Former Postdoc of the Elemento Lab and current CEO of OneThree Biotech
Taking a new technology from an idea to a company is a daunting process for first-time entrepreneurs – and especially in areas like commercialization which isn't a focus of most doctoral work. One thing that helps this is a community of scientists and entrepreneurs who have been through this before and help guide the way. In this way, resources such as the eLab’s Entrepreneurs-in-Residence are invaluable assets.
Francis Barany, Ph.D.
Francis Barany, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology and Immunology and National Academy of Inventors Fellow
The professionals at Enterprise Innovation possess strong first-hand knowledge of what it takes to start a company. Their expertise is vital to aspiring faculty scientist/entrepreneurs to launch new companies. Their guidance and feedback has been invaluable throughout the process – they are now helping me with my third company launch.

Understanding Entrepreneurship Adds Value to Scientific Investigators’ Work and Enterprise Innovation Can Help

November 17, 2022

Dr. Nicholas Schiff, the Jerold B. Katz Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience in the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute, was among the early participants in entrepreneurship activity at Weill Cornell Medicine — even before the institution had the complete ecosystem that is Enterprise Innovation today.

Sixth Annual Symposium on Entrepreneurship and Academic Drug Development Highlights Expanding Entrepreneurial Ecosystem

November 17, 2022

When ophthalmologist Dr. John Pena was a first-year resident, he helped to treat a child with a form of cancer that originates in the back of the eye. Dr. Pena used advanced technology to see inside the eye’s clear, gel-like structure called the vitreous, and found abundant microscopic structures that transport biological information from one cell to another. The patient’s case inspired Dr.